Lesson 3

 

Key Sentences

L3-K

tɑː jɑːrʊː jʊː?  Are you busy?
tɑːnæː ɑʤə̌l jɑːrʊː jʊː?  Is your work busy?
jɑːrʊː  (I’m) busy.
biː jɑːrʊː gue  I’m not busy.
biː tiːm jɑːrʊː gue  I’m not too busy.

 

Dialogs

One

L3-D1

 

A:  sæːn ʊː?
B:  sæːn    sæːn ʊː?
A:  tɑːnæː ɑʤə̌l jɑːrʊː jʊː?
B:  jɑːrʊː    tɑː jɑːrʊː jʊː?
A:  biː tiːm jɑːrʊː gue

Two

L3-D2

 

Student 1:  sæːn ʊ?
Student 2:  bɑgʧ sæːn ʊ?
Teacher:  tɑːnə̌r sæːn ʊː?
Student 2:  sæːn    bɑgʧ jɑːrʊː jʊː?
Teacher:  jɑːrʊː    tɑːnʊːs jɑːrʊː jʊː?
Student 2:  biː jɑːrʊː gue
Student 1:  biː bɑs jɑːrʊː gue

 

Three

L3-D3

 

A:  sæːn ʊ, tərgə̌l?
B:  sæːn
A:  tɑːnæː ɑːb əːʤ iːn ʧin bəj sæːn ʊ?
B:  təd budəːr əːn sæːn    bɑjə̌rllɑː

 

Notes
As you recal, /ʊː/ is a question particle. However, here it has become /jʊː/. That’s because it follows a long vowel sound. If the /j/ wasn’t added, it would be difficult to distinguish the question particle from the word.

Substitution

One

L3-S1

 

bɑgʧ ________ ʊː?

  • jɑːrʊː
  • sæːn
  • jɑdə̌rʤiːn

Two

L3-S2

 

A:  tɑːnæː ________ iːn ʧin bəj sæːn ʊː?
B:  təd bugdəːr əːn sæːn bæːnɑː

 

  • ɑːb əːʤ
  • ɑx əgʧ
  • duː nɑr

 

Notes:
No “and” is needed between “father and mother” and “older brother and older sister”.
/duː/ means younger brother, but when it is plural it can just refer to a younger siblings. The /nar/ in /duː nɑr/ makes it plural. If you want to specifically say a younger sister, you can say /œxə̌n duː/ or /xuːxə̌n duː/.

Expansion

One

L3-E1

 

  • nəgdʊgɑːr sɑr
  • xɔjə̌rdʊgɑːr sɑr
  • ʤʊrgɑːdʊgɑːr sɑr
  • ɑrbə̌n xɔjə̌rdʊgɑːr sɑr

 

Two

L3-E2

 

  • onoːdə̌r ɑrbə̌n sɑr iːn gʊʧə̌n nəg næː oːdə̌r
  • mɑrgɑːʃ ɑrbə̌n nəgə̌n sɑr iːn nəg næː oːdə̌r
  • ən ʤil xɔjə̌r mæŋg ɑrbə̌n gʊrbə̌n ɔn
  • dɑrɑː ʤil xɔjə̌r mæŋg ɑrbə̌n dorbə̌n ɔn

 

Notes:
Adding /dugɑːr/ to a number makes it an ordinal (first, second, third, etc.).
The months are pretty easy to learn in Mongolian because the are just First Month, Second Month, Third Month, and so on rather than January, February, March….
When just saying the name of the month, you have to add the /dʊgɑːr/ to the number. However, when you combine the month with a day (as in Expansion 2), you just use the number with an /n/.

Vocabulary

jɑːrʊː
busy
ɑʤə̌l
work, job
ugue
not, without
tiːm
really
biː
I
tɑːnʊːs
you (plural)
bugdəːr əːn
everybody
jɑdə̌rʤiːn
tired
ɑx
older brother
əgʧ
older sister
duː
younger brother
duː nɑr
younger siblings
œxə̌n duː
younger sister
xuːxə̌n duː
younger sister
nəgdʊgɑːr
first
xɔjə̌rdʊgɑːr
second
gʊrə̌bdʊgɑːr
third
dorə̌bdʊgɑːr
fourth
tɑbdʊgɑːr
fifth
ʤʊrgɑːdʊgɑːr
sixth
dɔlɔːdʊgɑːr
seventh
næːmdʊgɑːr
eighth
jisdʊgɑːr
ninth
ɑrə̌bdʊgɑːr
tenth
sɑr
month
mɑrgɑːʃ
tomorrow
ən
this
dɑrɑː
next
ʤil
year
ɔn
year (used after an actual year)
doʧ
forty
tæb
fifty
ʤir
sixty
dɑl
seventy
nɑj
eighty
jir
ninety
ʤʊː
hundred
mæŋg
thousand

L3-V

Grammar

More Numbers

Here are the numbers that we learned before with a few more added in.

L3-G1

Ordinal Numbers

The /dʊgɑːr/ ending is added to each number to make it an ordinal. Listen again:

 

  • 1st
  • 2nd
  • 3rd
  • 4th
  • 5th
  • 6th
  • 7th
  • 8th
  • 9th
  • 10th

 

L3-G2

Listen to the 12 months.

 

L3-G3

Listen to all the days in January and February.

Listen to the names of the years from 1970 to 2020.

They were talking pretty fast so I asked our teachers to speak more slowly. Here is 1995 again.

Practice

How do you say the following words:

  • tired
  • busy
  • work
  • older sister
  • January
  • younger sister
  • December
  • second
  • younger brother
  • older brother
  • March
  • fifth
  • all the days of September
  • your birthday
  • this year
  • next year
  • the year 2013
  • the year 2015

How do you say the following sentences:

  • Are you busy, teacher?
  • Is your work busy?
  • I’m not busy.
  • It’s 2014 this year.
  • Tomorrow is December 25.

Review by saying the following:

  • How is your health?
  • How are you?
  • Today is the 30th.
  • Thank you.
  • Goodbye.

If you were able to say most of these things correctly then you are ready to go on to lesson four. If not, then keep practicing! You can also download the audio for the whole lesson so that you can practice listening while walking in the park. Just right-click the link below and choose “Save Link As…” to download.

Main lesson 3

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If you have any questions about this lesson or if you notice a mistake, then please leave a comment below. If I don’t know the answer myself, then I will ask our teachers.

4 comments on “Lesson 3
  1. London Park says:

    Hey!

    Thanks for another lesson. I am learning so much. And numbers are hard but you teach good! And by the way I can’t figure out what the word is in the numbers section after “Jo” one hundred, it says “Jo boget neg”. I know the first word is one hundred and the last one is one, but what is the one pronounced like boget? Please help. Thank you bye bye.

    • Suragch says:

      Good question. The new words that appear in the Grammar section I don’t usually put in the vocabulary list. This one should be, though. You will see it again in Lesson 5, and it is in the vocabulary list there.

      Anyway, /bogoːd/ basically means “and” when it is used with a number. It is used for 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108, and 109 to indicate the zero between the hundred’s place and the one’s place. Same thing for 201, 304, 702, 1001, etc.

  2. Martin says:

    There appears to be an error in the transliteration of the last 2 sentences of Expansion 2 namely

    ən ʤil xɔjə̌r mæŋg ɑrbə̌n gʊrbə̌n ɔn
    dɑrɑː ʤil xɔjə̌r mæŋg ɑrbə̌n dorbə̌n ɔn

    Shouldn’t these two sentences end in

    gʊrə̌bdʊgɑːr ɔn
    dorə̌bdʊgɑːr ɔn
    ?

    • Suragch says:

      I don’t think there is a problem with the transliteration. That is, I think I wrote it as our teachers said it. However, it sounds like your question is more of a grammatical one. Are you saying, shouldn’t the years end with the ordinal -dʊgɑːr suffix? That would make it the two thousand and thirteenth year and the two thousand and fourteenth year, which would make sense in a way. As far as I know, though, that is not how years are said. (But it is how months are said, as we learned in the grammar section.)

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